ARE 5.0 Project Development & Documentation Exam Prep

Previous Chapter:
Objective 1.1: Analyze the Integration of Architectural Systems and Technologies to Meet Project Goals

Currently Viewing:
Objective 1.2: Determine the Size of Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing Systems and Components to Meet Project Goals

Course Videos
Practical Applications - Upgrade to Pro

Up Next:
Objective 1.3: Determine the Size of Structural Systems to Meet Project Goals

You have reached one of our paid video tutorials for the course:

ARE 5.0 Project Development & Documentation Exam Prep

You can either log in to view it or learn more about our memberships.

Hydronic Heating - Consider

5m 8s

In this ARE 5.0 NCARB-approved Project Development and Documentation Exam Prep course you will learn about the topics covered in the ARE 5.0 PDD exam division. A complete and comprehensive curriculum, this course will touch on each of the NCARB objectives for the ARE 5.0 Project Development and Documentation Exam.

Instructor Mike Newman will discuss issues related to the development of design concepts, the evaluation of materials and technologies, selection of appropriate construction techniques, and appropriate construction documentation.

When you are done with this course, you will have a thorough understanding of the content covered in the ARE 5.0 Project Development and Documentation Exam including integration of civil, structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and specialty systems into overall project design and documentation.

Transcript summarylog in to access this content in full.

One of the greatest things, I think, about the in-floor radiant is I might actually keep the temperature much lower in the space, but feel just as warm because my feet are warm because the things are reasonably warm. So I might have the space be at 65 or 66 degrees, something like that, whereas, with a air-based system, in order to feel comfortable I might have it at 72, 73, 74, something like that, so I'm raising the heat of the system in order to feel comfortable but that wouldn't necessarily be what I was calculating it on. So, we probably were calculating it on the idea of it being 68 for both of them, so from a calculation standpoint, I might get a very different number in terms of what's the most efficient than in an actual setting where people will use them very differently.

Log in to access files

From the course:
ARE 5.0 Project Development & Documentation Exam Prep

Duration: 36h 49m

Author: Mike Newman